Class Agenda #124 – “Hamlet” – Finishing Up

Class Agenda #124- Hamlet – Finishing Up

Homework- Charles will Check and COLLECT Your HW- Tracking Themes at Ophelia’s Funeral

  • Opener- Song- “Make’em NV” J DIlla  (2007, 2:32)
  • You Need: Laptop, Hamlet, Notebook

Opener- 5 Min

  • SLT- I can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • Journal-
  • Explain how the end of Hamlet was a “tragic resolution.”
  • Would you consider Hamlet to be a “tragic hero?
  • Partner Share
  • Try to spark a whole class discussion.

Whole Class- This is a work Period

Mini-Lesson- Reviewing the phrase- “tragic resolution” and “tragic hero”

The Final Scene Of Hamlet

  • Partner Work- Focusing on Lines 239-332 – teacher moves– review every 4 questions or work in small groups.

  • ReRead these lines with your partner.

    Work Together to Answer the Discussion Questions.

    What is the “sore distraction” Hamlet refers to on line 244?

    What does Hamlet mean when he says, “Was ‘t Hamlet wronged Laertes? Never Hamlet”?

    Why does Hamlet refer to himself in the third person on lines 247–253?

    How does Laertes respond to Hamlet’s request for forgiveness?

    How does this exchange between Hamlet and Laertes further develop two central ideas introduced earlier in the play?

    Why does Laertes say, “it is almost against my conscience” on line 324? What does this suggest about the relationship between conscience and revenge?

    What happens during the fencing match immediately following line 330? What does this suggest will happen to Hamlet and Laertes later in the scene?

    Focusing on Lines 344-398-

    What does Hamlet mean when he says, “Then, venom to thy work” (lines 352–353)? What does Hamlet do after he says, “Then, venom, to thy work”? Use the stage direction for context.

    Before Laertes dies, what does he request of Hamlet? What does Hamlet mean when he responds, “Heaven make thee free of it” (line 364)?

    Why does Hamlet ask Horatio to “Absent [himself] from felicity a while” in line 382?

    Why is Hamlet a tragic hero?

    What aspect of Hamlet’s character leads to his downfall?

    Why is the resolution to the play defined as “tragic”?

     

    EXIT Ticket

    How does Hamlet’s downfall contribute to the tragic resolution of the play?

    Home Work-

    Prepare For Your SLC

    Standards-

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

  • 2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

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