Class Agenda #123 – “Hamlet” – Act 5.2 – The Final Scene

Class Agenda #123- Hamlet – Act 5.2 – The Final Scene 

Homework- Charles will Check and COLLECT Your HW- Tracking Themes at Ophelia’s Funeral

  • Opener- Song- “Don’t Sweat The Technique” Eric B. & Rakim (1992, 4:22)
  • You Need: Hamlet Page 124, Notebook, Homework, Handout

Opener- 5 Min

  • SLT- I can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • Journal- Look at the definition for the term “tragic resolution,”
    • Underline the verbs, Bold the nouns.
      • What do you think this term means?
      • Compare “tragic resolution” to today’s learning target.
  • Tragic Resolution- “an event or series of events that involves a reversal of fortune and the resolution of previously unresolved conflicts.”
  • Partner Share

Whole Class-

Reading Part 1- (5 Min) Review Claudius and Laretes’ plan to kill Hamlet.

  • Page 111-112- Lines 141-186
  • Do- Read Silently
  •  Partner- pair share- what is Laertes’s and Claudius’s plan? AND, What is the motivation for their plan?

    Reading Part II (15 Min)- Hamlet

    Pages 124-138

    Read along as we play this film

    Continue to TEXT CODE Passages that connect to our Central Themes

  • Partner Work- Focusing on Lines 239-332

    ReRead these lines with your partner.

    Work Together to Answer the Discussion Questions.

    What is the “sore distraction” Hamlet refers to on line 244?

    What does Hamlet mean when he says, “Was ‘t Hamlet wronged Laertes? Never Hamlet”?

    Why does Hamlet refer to himself in the third person on lines 247–253?

    How does Laertes respond to Hamlet’s request for forgiveness?

    How does this exchange between Hamlet and Laertes further develop two central ideas introduced earlier in the play?

    Why does Laertes say, “it is almost against my conscience” on line 324? What does this suggest about the relationship between conscience and revenge?

    What happens during the fencing match immediately following line 330? What does this suggest will happen to Hamlet and Laertes later in the scene?

    EXIT Ticket

    How do two central ideas from previous readings develop and build on one another in the fencing match between Hamlet and Laertes? Standards

    Home Work-

    Write a response to the following question: How does the action on lines 239–332 of Act 5.2 (from “Come, Hamlet, come and take this hand” to “Part them. They are incensed. / Nay, come again.”) further develop Hamlet’s character?

    Standards-

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

  • 2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

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