Monthly Archives: May 2015

Class Agenda #133 – New York State Regents Questions 26 and 27 and…

Class Agenda #133- New York State Regents Prep and, “Monkey House” Day II 

  • Opening Circle- Regents getting easier or nah?
  • Opening Song- “We Tryin to Stay Alive” Wycleff (1988, 4:45)

Opener- 5 Min

  • SLT- I can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • Poem- “Time To Talk” by Robert Frost

  • A Time to Talk

    When a friend calls to me from the road          1
    And slows his horse to a meaning walk,
    I don’t stand still and look around
    On all the hills I haven’t hoed,
    And shout from where I am, ‘What is it?’           5
    No, not as there is a time talk.
    I thrust my hoe in the mellow ground,
    Blade-end up and five feet tall,
    And plod: I go up to the stone wall                     10
    For a friendly visit.

    – Robert Frost

    Journal- Choose 1 of the first 2, and the last question:

  • What Literary Elements are Used in the story and the poem’
  • What is the controlling idea between the “Welcome to The Monkey House” and “Time To Talk” –
  • In Line 10 of the poem “Time to Talk” what is the “Author’s Purpose” for using the word “plod?” How does this connect to other ideas in the poem?

Whole Class- Review The Rubric for Questions 26 and 27

  • Mini-Lesson- Looking Over Questions 26 and 27

    Class Work- Write your answers to Questions 26 and 27 in your Notebook

    Question 26

    (used for 2-credit responses that refer to two texts)

    • presents a well-developed paragraph
    • demonstrates a basic understanding of the texts
    • establishes an appropriate controlling idea
    • supports the controlling idea with clear and appropriate details from both texts • uses language that is appropriate
    • may exhibit errors in conventions that do not hinder comprehension

    Score Point 1

    • has a controlling idea or

    • implies a controlling idea or

    • has an unclear controlling idea AND

    • supports the controlling idea with partial and/or overly general information from the texts • uses language that may be imprecise or inappropriate
    • exhibits errors in conventions that may hinder comprehension

    Score Point 0

    • is off topic, incoherent, a copy of the task/texts, or blank • demonstrates no understanding of the task/texts
    • is a personal response

    Score these:

     Passage 1 and Passage II talks about controlling idea of growing old. Growing old is life, you cannot stop it because that is nature. Passage I talks about getting struggling with aging. The narrator is comparing aging to the calendar. “I’m old, they say. The calendar says so too.: this quote is explaining that days goes fast and his age.
    Passage II talks about a dog on his birthday, a birthday is an example about growing old. The dog in Passage II is an observer. It observes everything. With age, the dog has become more conscious of his relationship with his owners.

    Now this one-

    All people must face the inevitable process of growing older, which sometimes leads to feeling so helplessness and apathy and a loss of enthusiasm about life. In both passage I, an excerpt from a short story, and Passage II, a poem, characters must face the process of aging and the feelings that come with it. In Passage I, the narrator expresses the disappointment and cynicism that he has developed as he has grown older. He discusses adversities which he has faced such as “the perfidy of friends and the trickery of the flesh, lost frontiers,…the death of dreams, solitude, pain…: He mourns loved ones, stating, “every loss is a tear in the heart’s tender flesh.” The dog in Passage II has also lost the enthusiasm and excitement of youth. He is shown to be quite apathetic. No longer as playful as a young puppy, when his owner attempts to “loss his ragged stuffed lion,” the dog will “seem to want to say “you don’t have to play with me. I’m fine then mosey over and take the toy back to his spot.” Each of these passages demonstrate the loss of enthusiasm and the disappointment that often come with aging.

    Class Work-

    Option I- Copy, word for word, type or write the 2 point passage. Get used to using those words. Learn through imitation.

    Option II- Continue your journal assignments.

    Option III- Reread portions of Monkey House.

    Homework- Finish Journal assignments or copying the 2 point response.

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Class Agenda #132 – New York State Regents Question 28 and…

Class Agenda #132- New York State Regents Prep and, “Welcome To The Monkey House” 

  • Opening Circle- Do You Agree Or Disagree with The Quote? And what are 2 texts that you could tie to it?
  • Reading

    “A person is a person through other persons…” -Archbishop Desmond Tutu

    • Opening Song- “Sway” Pink Martini (2013, 3:45)

Opener- 5 Min

  • SLT- I can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

15 Min Reading

  • Mini-Lesson- Looking Over Question 28
  • Part 4 (Question 28) Your Task:

    Write a critical essay in which you discuss two works of literature you have read from the particular perspective of the statement that is provided for you in the Critical Lens. In your essay, provide a valid interpretation of the statement, agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it, and support your opinion using specific references to appropriate literary elements from the two works. You may use scrap paper to plan your response. Write your essay beginning on page 3 of the essay booklet.

    Critical Lens:

    “…the greater the difficulty, the greater the glory.”

    Ethical Writings of Cicero

    Cicero

    1887 Translation

     

    Guidelines:

    Be sure to

    • Provide a valid interpretation of the critical lens that clearly establishes the criteria for analysis
    • Indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it
    • Choose two works you have read that you believe best support your opinion
    • Use the criteria suggested by the critical lens to analyze the works you have

      chosen

    • Avoid plot summary. Instead, use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example: theme, characterization, setting, point of view) to develop your analysis
    • Organize your ideas in a unified and coherent manner
    • Specify the titles and authors of the literature you choose
    • Follow the conventions of standard written English

    Look at the Anchor Chart- Copy it into your memory.

    Look at Some Quality Examples together-

    Class Work- Choose one of the following based on what you think you need most for regents prep. Let a Teacher know if you’re unsure and we can assist you.

    Task 1- Interpret 3-4 of the following Quotes. Say whether you Agree or Disagree with them and Why. Look at the REAL Paragraph at the front of the room.

    Task 2- Review the Rubric and 6 Point Vs. 4 Point Essays for the Critical Lens. Journal- What are some of the qualities of the essay?

    Task 3- Practice writing the Critical Lens Essay above. Think about “Hamlet”, “Native Son”, “A Good Man Is Hard to Find”, Fences,” etc…

    Task 4- ReRead the First Part of “Welcome to The Monkey House,” closely, so that you know that characters and the story and can write about it.

     

    Home Work-

    Connect the Following Quote to “How To Date a Brown Girl,” and “Hamlet.”

    • “We do not read novels for improvement or instruction.” -Oliver Wendell Holmes

     

     

    Standards-

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

  • 2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #131 – New York State Regents Questions 26 and 27 and…

Class Agenda #131- New York State Regents Prep and, “How To Date A Brown Girl” 

  • Opening Circle- What was the most challenging part of your test yesterday?
  • Opening Song- “Staying Alive” The Bee Gees (1988, 4:45)

Opener- 5 Min

  • SLT- I can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • Read- “How to Date A Brown Girl” – By Junot Diaz
  • Read- “Innocence Lost” by David Blankson

    Innocence Lost

    Mired in the daily grind 
    Our backs bend 
    in quiet desperation. 
    Shadows scream 
    And memories weep, 
    Horrified of lost dreams 
    From quieter times:
    
    Times more peaceful;
    The tender fascination 
    Of sun warming skin,
    The tactile pleasure of
    Rubbing palms on carpet, 
    The bliss inherent 
    In running on a playground. 
    
    Dreams from yesteryear 
    Fade from our view
    Left behind, like
    Some misbegotten notion
    Of an enthralled child
    From the old days
    Of supposed immaturity. 
    
    Maturity gained, 
    But at what cost? 
    Loss of innocence
    And dreams of grandeur? 
    Are these the qualities 
    Of someone unworthy 
    To guide us in return
  • Journal- Choose at least 1 on your own:

  • What Literary Elements are Used in the story and the poem’
  • What is the controlling idea between the “How to Date a Brown Girl” and “Innocence Lost” –
  • What is the “Author’s Purpose” in this story?

Whole Class- Review Both Literary Elements and What’s the Controlling Idea.

  • Mini-Lesson- Looking Over Questions 26 and 27

    Directions (26–27): Write your responses to question 26 on page 1 of your essay booklet and question 27 on page 2 of your essay booklet. Be sure to answer both questions.

    26 Write a well-developed paragraph in which you use ideas from both Passage I (the short story excerpt) and Passage II (the poem) to establish a controlling idea about youth. Develop your controlling idea using specific examples and details from both Passage I and Passage II.

    27 Choose a specific literary element (e.g., theme, characterization, structure, point of view, etc.) or literary technique (e.g., symbolism, irony, figurative language, etc.) used by one of the authors. Using specific details from either Passage I (the short story excerpt) or Passage II (the poem), in a well-developed paragraph, show how the author uses that element or technique to develop the passage.

    Look at the Anchor Chart- Copy it into your memory.

    Class Work- Write your answers to Questions 26 and 27 in your Notebook

    Home Work-

    Connect the Following Quote to “How To Date a Brown Girl,” and “Hamlet.”

    • “We do not read novels for improvement or instruction.” -Oliver Wendell Holmes

     

     

    Standards-

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

  • 2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #129 – “Hamlet” – Final Product Final Day

Class Agenda #129- Hamlet – Final Product Final Day

Opening Circle

I am making you write about Hamlet for your Regents. Do you feel comfortable with another story, novel or play enough to write about it? Or Nah? What is it?

  • Opener- Song- “10 Long Years” B.B. King (1955, 4:40)
  • You Need: Laptop, Hamlet, Notebook

Regents Opener- 10 Min

  • SLT- I can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

 

  • Opening Journal-
    • What is another story, play or novel that you’ve read, that you can write about for the regents?
      • If you’re unsure of the details of the story, take a few minutes to look up:
        • The Author, Title, Main Characters, Minor Characters, A summary of the plot, etc…
    • Connect your story to the following Quote-
    •  “In a dark time, the eye begins to see…” -Theodore Roethke
    • Write An Opening Paragraph for A ELA REGENTS CRITICAL LENSE Essay 
      • After your opening hook, try this-
    • REAL
    • R: Restate the quote in your own words

      E: Explain what the quote means  

      A: Agree or Disagree with the quote

      L: Literary Elements and Literature Connection (this is your two works of Literature that connects to your interpretation of the quote)

    • Connect this Quote to “Hamlet.”
    • Try to Connect the quote to “A Good Man Is Hard to Find.”
  • Share at tables.
  • Share as class.

Work Time-

  • Proofread to make sure your essays are all on fleek.
  • Read your partner’s essays to make sure their essay’s on fleek.
  • Extend your opening journal to include several other books.
  • Check out this work by Kurt Vonnegut- MonkStry

Hamlet Final Essay. – Text Code

  • What is the task?
  • How many paragraphs do you think this essay is?

End-of-Unit Assessment (11.1.2 Lesson 25)

Text-Based Response
Your Task: Rely on your reading and analysis of Hamlet, including your Central Idea Evidence Collection

Tool, to write a well-developed response to the following prompt:

Identify two central ideas from the play. How do these ideas interact and build on one another over the course of the play? In your response, identify and discuss at least one literary device that Shakespeare uses to develop or relate these central ideas.

Your writing will be assessed using the Text Analysis Rubric.

Guidelines:

Be sure to:

  •   Read the prompt closely
  •   Address all elements of the prompt in your response
  •   Paraphrase, quote, and reference relevant evidence to support your claim
  •   Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner
  •   Maintain a formal style of writing
  •   Follow the conventions of standard written English

Due on Friday. Do it on it’s own google doc.

General Outline

First Paragraph- Intro

Body- Central Idea and Literary Element used to show that Central Idea.

Body- Central Idea and Literary Element used to show that Central Idea

Conclusion- Last Paragraph

 

Class Work-

Goal- Get done with your first paragraph and first body section.

The Final Scene Of Hamlet

  • EXIT Ticket

    How many paragraphs are you going to write?

    Home Work-

    Review and synthesize the evidence you collected on the Central Idea Evidence Collection Tool and consider how to respond to the End-of-Unit Assessment prompt:

    Identify two central ideas from the play. How do these ideas interact and build on one another over the course of the play? In your response, identify and discuss at least one literary device that Shakespeare uses to develop or relate these central ideas.

    Standards-

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

  • 2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #128 – “Hamlet” – Final Product Day 4

Class Agenda #128- Hamlet – Final Product Day 4 and Some Regents Thinking.

Opening Circle

“Good people…are good because they’ve come to wisdom through failure.” -William Saroyan

Agree Or Disagree with the quote?

  • Opener- Song- “Lost” Frank Ocean (2012, 3:57)
  • You Need: Laptop, Hamlet, Notebook

Regents Opener- 10 Min

  • SLT- I can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

 

  • Opening Journal-
    •  “Good people…are good because they’ve come to wisdom through failure.” -William Saroyan
    • Write An Opening Paragraph for A ELA REGENTS CRITICAL LENSE Essay 
      • After your opening hook, try this-
    • REAL
    • R: Restate the quote in your own words

      E: Explain what the quote means  

      A: Agree or Disagree with the quote

      L: Literary Elements and Literature Connection (this is your two works of Literature that connects to your interpretation of the quote)

    • Connect this Quote to “Hamlet.”
    • Try to Connect the quote to “A Good Man Is Hard to Find.”
  • Share at tables.
  • Share as class.

Mini-Lesson- 5 Minutes 

Changing your Tenses!

  • Grapple with this together.

Work Time-

  • Proofread your essay to make sure your tenses are all on fleek.
  • Make a goal of 2nd body paragraph.

Hamlet Final Essay. – Text Code

  • What is the task?
  • How many paragraphs do you think this essay is?

End-of-Unit Assessment (11.1.2 Lesson 25)

Text-Based Response
Your Task: Rely on your reading and analysis of Hamlet, including your Central Idea Evidence Collection

Tool, to write a well-developed response to the following prompt:

Identify two central ideas from the play. How do these ideas interact and build on one another over the course of the play? In your response, identify and discuss at least one literary device that Shakespeare uses to develop or relate these central ideas.

Your writing will be assessed using the Text Analysis Rubric.

Guidelines:

Be sure to:

  •   Read the prompt closely
  •   Address all elements of the prompt in your response
  •   Paraphrase, quote, and reference relevant evidence to support your claim
  •   Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner
  •   Maintain a formal style of writing
  •   Follow the conventions of standard written English

Due on Friday. Do it on it’s own google doc.

General Outline

First Paragraph- Intro

Body- Central Idea and Literary Element used to show that Central Idea.

Body- Central Idea and Literary Element used to show that Central Idea

Conclusion- Last Paragraph

 

Class Work-

Goal- Get done with your first paragraph and first body section.

The Final Scene Of Hamlet

  • EXIT Ticket

    How many paragraphs are you going to write?

    Home Work-

    Review and synthesize the evidence you collected on the Central Idea Evidence Collection Tool and consider how to respond to the End-of-Unit Assessment prompt:

    Identify two central ideas from the play. How do these ideas interact and build on one another over the course of the play? In your response, identify and discuss at least one literary device that Shakespeare uses to develop or relate these central ideas.

    Standards-

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

  • 2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #124 – “Hamlet” – Final Product Day 3

Class Agenda #124- Hamlet – Final Product Day 3 and Some Regents Thinking.

Opening Circle

“A story must be exceptional enough to justify its telling; it must have something more unusual to relate than the ordinary   experience of every average man and woman.” -Thomas Hardy

Agree Or Disagree with the quote?

  • Opener- Song- “Love Shack” B-52’s (1989, 4:17)
  • You Need: Laptop, Hamlet, Notebook

Regents Opener- 15 Min

  • SLT- I can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

 

  • Opening Journal-
    •  “A story must be exceptional enough to justify its telling; it must have something more unusual to relate than the ordinary   experience of every average man and woman.” -Thomas Hardy
    • Write An Opening Paragraph for an Essay 
      • After your opening hook, try this-
    • REAL
    • R: Restate the quote in your own words

      E: Explain what the quote means  

      A: Agree or Disagree with the quote

      L: Literary Elements and Literature Connection (this is your two works of Literature that connects to your interpretation of the quote)

  • Share at tables.
  • Share as class.

Mini-Lesson- 5 Minutes 

Hamlet Final Essay. – Text Code

  • What is the task?
  • How many paragraphs do you think this essay is?

End-of-Unit Assessment (11.1.2 Lesson 25)

Text-Based Response
Your Task: Rely on your reading and analysis of Hamlet, including your Central Idea Evidence Collection

Tool, to write a well-developed response to the following prompt:

Identify two central ideas from the play. How do these ideas interact and build on one another over the course of the play? In your response, identify and discuss at least one literary device that Shakespeare uses to develop or relate these central ideas.

Your writing will be assessed using the Text Analysis Rubric.

Guidelines:

Be sure to:

  •   Read the prompt closely
  •   Address all elements of the prompt in your response
  •   Paraphrase, quote, and reference relevant evidence to support your claim
  •   Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner
  •   Maintain a formal style of writing
  •   Follow the conventions of standard written English

Due on Friday. Do it on it’s own google doc.

General Outline

First Paragraph- Intro

Body- Central Idea and Literary Element used to show that Central Idea.

Body- Central Idea and Literary Element used to show that Central Idea

Conclusion- Last Paragraph

 

Class Work-

Goal- Get done with your first paragraph and first body section.

The Final Scene Of Hamlet

  • EXIT Ticket

    How many paragraphs are you going to write?

    Home Work-

    Review and synthesize the evidence you collected on the Central Idea Evidence Collection Tool and consider how to respond to the End-of-Unit Assessment prompt:

    Identify two central ideas from the play. How do these ideas interact and build on one another over the course of the play? In your response, identify and discuss at least one literary device that Shakespeare uses to develop or relate these central ideas.

    Standards-

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

  • 2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #126 – “Hamlet” – Final Product Day 2

Class Agenda #126- Hamlet – Final Product Day 2

Opening Circle

“In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers.” –  Anonymous 

Agree Or Disagree with the quote?

  • Opener- Song- “Who’s Loving You” Jackson 5 (1969, 4:00)
  • You Need: Laptop, Hamlet, Notebook

Opener- 5 Min

  • SLT- I can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

 

  • Opening Journal-“In literature, evil often triumphs but never conquers.” –  Anonymous 
    • Write a general opening statement that leads to the quote
    • restate the quote
    • Write whether or not you agree with the quote
    • State how the quote relates to Hamlet
    • Bonus- State how the quote applies to any other story or work that you read.
  • Share at tables.
  • Share as class.

Mini-Lesson- 5 Minutes 

Reviewing the Central Ideas in Hamlet-

Central Idea #1 ________revenge_________

Central Idea #2
___action versus inaction___

Central Idea #3 ______madness_________

Central Idea #4 ________mortality__________

Evidence from text

“Let not the royal bed of Denmark be a couch for luxury and damned incest.” (Act 1.5, lines 89–90)

“Thy commandment all alone shall live within the book and volume of my brain” (Act 1.5, lines 109–110)

“Like John-a-dreams, unpregnant of my cause” (Act 2.2, line 595)

Hamlet commits to kill Claudius while he is kneeling but then changes his mind and decides to wait. (Act 3.3)

The question of Hamlet’s madness endures throughout the play. Hamlet tells Horatio he might “put an antic disposition on” (Act 1.5, line 192) meaning that Hamlet may act as though he is mad.

“O that this too, too sullied flesh would melt” (Act 1.2, line 133)

“To be or not to be” (Act 3.1, line 64)

Ophelia drowns herself. (Act 4.7, line 188)

 

Think about some “literary elements” attached to this:

Literary devices Shakespeare uses:

Simile – Hamlet says he is “like John-a-dreams…”

Foil – Shakespeare uses Claudius, Laertes, and Fortinbras as foils to highlight Hamlet’s inaction.

Simile – Ophelia compares Hamlet’s lost reason to “sweet bells jangled, out of time and harsh” (Act 3.1, line 172)

Metaphor – In Act 3.1 Hamlet imagines death as sleep: “To die, to sleep” (line 68)

What role does this idea play in Hamlet?

Revenge drives Hamlet’s actions throughout the play as he struggles with how to kill Claudius.

Action versus inaction is central to Hamlet’s tragic flaw of indecision.

Hamlet acts mad at times in the play, but the reader is not certain if Hamlet is pretending to be mad or if he has actually gone mad.

Hamlet considers mortality throughout the play, and in the tragic resolution, three main characters die.

Distribute- Hamlet Final Essay.

Due on Friday.

Class Work-

Outline and begin your essay

The Final Scene Of Hamlet

  • EXIT Ticket

    How does Hamlet’s downfall contribute to the tragic resolution of the play?

    Home Work-

    Review and synthesize the evidence you collected on the Central Idea Evidence Collection Tool and consider how to respond to the End-of-Unit Assessment prompt:

    Identify two central ideas from the play. How do these ideas interact and build on one another over the course of the play? In your response, identify and discuss at least one literary device that Shakespeare uses to develop or relate these central ideas.

    Standards-

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

  • 2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-