Monthly Archives: April 2015

Class Agenda #112 – “Hamlet” – Act 3.3 –

Class Agenda #112- Hamlet – Act 3.3 – 

Homework- Charles will Check Your OPENING Journal

Opening Circle- Opening Reading I – KING Claudius 

    • Love? His affections do not that way tend;
      Nor what he spake, though it lacked form a little,

      Was not like madness. There’s something in his soul

      O’er which his melancholy sits on brood,
      And I do doubt the hatch and the disclose
      Will be some danger; which for to prevent,
      I have in quick determination

      Thus set it down: he shall with speed to England

      For the demand of our neglected tribute.
      Haply the seas, and countries different,
      With variable objects, shall expel

      This something-settled matter in his heart,

      Whereon his brains still beating puts him thus

      From fashion of himself. What think you on ’t?

      Journal- Based on What king Claudius says, what does he now feel about Hamlet and his madness? Analyze your evidence from the text.

      • Share at your tables.
  • Review Homework at Table (share 1 thing protocol)
  • Song- “Under My Thumb,” The Rolling Stones (1966, 3:43)

  • SLT-

    I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    What stands out about this SLT again?

  • Is this scene a better reflection of Claudius’s guilt or Hamlet’s madness?
  • Begin Reading together Act 3.3
  • Homework- Finish Reading 3.3 on your own.

    Answer the following prompt-

    How are our CENTRAL THEMES of Mortality, Revenge, Madness and Action Vs. Inaction being used Act 3.3? Be sure to analyze your evidence.

     

    Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

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Class Agenda #112 – “Hamlet” – Act 3.1 – Hamlet and Ophelia III

Class Agenda #112- Hamlet – Act 3.1 – Hamlet and Ophelia III

Homework- Charles will Check Your OPENING Journal AND HOMEWORK

Opening Circle- Group Juggle

Opening Reading I – 

        • SLT- Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
        •  Song- “Good Day” – Ice Cube (4:20, 1992)
            • deject (adj.) – dejected, made gloomy
            • wretched (adj.) – very unhappy, ill, etc.
            • blown (adj.) – archaic for in bloom, vigorous, fresh
            • ecstasy (n.) – archaic for madness
            • melancholy (n.) – a gloomy state of mind, especially when habitual or prolonged; depression
            • neglected (adj.) – given little attention or respect
            • tribute (n.) – a stated sum or other valuable consideration paid by one sovereign or state in acknowledgement of subjugation or as the price of peace, security, protection, or the like
            • expel (v.) – to drive or force out or away
            • origin (n.) – the point or place where something begins or is created; the source or cause of
            • something
            • commencement (n.) – beginning, start
            • entreat (v.) – to beg
            • confine (v.) – to shut or keep in
            • Use the space provided to write 2-3 sentences using this vocabulary.

           

           

          Part II- Lines 163-175 in Hamlet. Think about what happened. Hamlet and Ophelia broke up. Hamlet realized he was being watched.

           

          OPHELIA

          O, what a noble mind is here o’erthrown!

          The courtier’s, soldier’s, scholar’s, eye, tongue, sword,

          Th’ expectancy and rose of the fair state,

          The glass of fashion and the mold of form,

          Th’ observed of all observers, quite, quite down!

          And I, of ladies most deject and wretched,

          That sucked the honey of his musicked vows,

          Now see that noble and most sovereign reason,

          Like sweet bells jangled, out of time and harsh;

          That unmatched form and stature of blown youth

          Blasted with ecstasy. O, woe is me

          T’ have seen what I have seen, see what I see!

           

          Discussion Questions-

          The passage begins, “O, what a noble mind is here o’erthrown!” (line 163). What parts of this sentence and the word itself can help you make meaning of the word o’erthrown?

           

           

          What images does Ophelia use to describe Hamlet in lines 166–168? What is the cumulative impact of these images on her tone towards Hamlet?

          What words does Ophelia use to describe herself in line 169? What is the meaning or connotation (feeling) of these words?

          What does Ophelia mean by the phrase “And I…sucked the honey of his musicked vows” (lines 169– 170)? How does this line relate to the accusations Hamlet made in the lines just before this monologue?

          What extended metaphor does Ophelia create in lines 170–172? How does the metaphor impact the development of Hamlet’s character?

          The footnote on “blown” states that it is a word used to describe flowers in bloom. The explanatory notes on “ecstasy” defines it as madness. Using these explanatory notes, paraphrase lines 173–174.

          How does this metaphor compare to the imagery in the rest of the monologue?

          Final Question- What does Ophelia’s characterization of Hamlet suggest about her perspective on Hamlet?

           

           

          Exit-

          How does Shakespeare develop Ophelia’s character through her interactions with Laertes and Hamlet?

           

           

Class Agenda #111 – “Hamlet” – Act 3.1 – Hamlet and Ophelia II

Class Agenda #111- Hamlet – Act 3.1 – Hamlet and Ophelia II

Homework- Charles will Check Your OPENING Journal AND HOMEWORK

Opening Circle- Opening Reading I – 

        • SLT- Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
        •  
            • nunnery (n.) – convent (The word was sometimes used mockingly to refer to a brothel.)
            • breeder (n.) – an animal, plant, or person that produces offspring or reproduces
            • cuckolds (n.) – husbands of unfaithful wives
            • calumny (n.) – a false and malicious statement designed to injure the reputation of someone or something
              • plague (n.) – any widespread affliction, calamity, or evil, especially one regarded as a direct punishment by God
              • dowry (n.) – the money or property brought by a woman to her husband at marriage
              • amble (v.) – to move at a slow and easy pace

           

          Use the space provided to write 2-3 sentences using this vocabulary.

          Reading- Lines 131-162

          Hamlet and Ophelia

          Discussion Questions-

          Why would Hamlet tell Ophelia to go to a nunnery? What subject(s) did he just discuss with her that relate to a nunnery?

           

          The explanatory note suggests that the word nunnery was sometimes used to refer to a brothel (house of prostitution). How does this alternate meaning impact your understanding of what Hamlet could be saying? How could Hamlet be using both meanings of nunnery in this context?

          What new reason for Ophelia needing a nunnery does Hamlet introduce in lines 131–132? What evidence does Hamlet use to support this reason?

          Of what things does Hamlet accuse himself?

          What is the impact of lines 154–158 on Hamlet’s tone toward Ophelia or women in general? Cite specific words and phrases to demonstrate his tone.

          Review Laertes

          What advice did Laertes give Ophelia regarding Hamlet?

          What reasons does he give for this advice?

          Consider the idea that both men are raising here. Which of Laertes’s lines echo Hamlet’s?

          How does Ophelia respond to Laertes’s advice? How does this relate to her response to Hamlet’s accusations? Consider both what she says and how she says it.

          Exit-

          How does Shakespeare develop Ophelia’s character through her interactions with Laertes and Hamlet?

Class Agenda #110 – “Hamlet” – Act 3.1 – Hamlet and Ophelia

Class Agenda #110- Hamlet – Act 3.1 – Hamlet and Ophelia

Homework- Charles will Check Your OPENING Journal AND HOMEWORK

Opening Circle- Opening Reading I – 

  • aught (v.) – anything whatever
  •   wax (v.) – assume a (specified) characteristic, quality, or state

    •   discourse (n.) – conversation
    •   bawd (n.) – prostitute
      • remembrances (n.) – greetings or gifts recalling or expressing friendship or affection
      •  long (adv.) – for or through a great extent of space, or, especially, time
      •   longèd (v.) – had an earnest or strong desire or craving; yearned
      •   rich (adj.) – of great value or worth; valuable
      •   poor (adj.) – small in worth
      •   chaste (adj.) – refraining from sexual intercourse that is regarded as contrary to morality or religion
      •   honest (adj.) – good and truthful; chaste
      •   fair (adj.) – marked by impartiality and honesty; beautiful

      Journal- Use ANY 6 Vocabulary Words from HAMLET in a sentence or two.

      • Share at your tables.
  • Review Homework at Table (share 1 thing protocol)
  • Song- “House Of The Rising Sun” The Animals (4:32- 1964)

  • SLT-

    I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    Review Last Nights Homework- Use the text to establish Hamlet’s attitude toward life and death, noting Shakespeare’s specific use of metaphor and language that is fresh, engaging, and beautiful.

    • In the play Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, the play’s protagonist, Hamlet’s attitude towards life and death is complicated. He views his current life as a state of inaction and suffering, and he chastises himself for his inaction- “There’s the respect… with a bare bodkin?” With this long section of figurative language, Hamlet explains how he wishes he could act, and that those who lead long lives do act, but he cannot.  Heis concerned that death could be even worse if he is to continue to suffer this torment in his dreams for all eternity.

 

  • Reading -Act 3.1 – Lines 31-63, Then Lines 99-130
    • Where to Claudius and Polonius “withdraw” to?
    • What topics to Hamlet and Ophelia discuss?
  • 99-130 Discussion Questions– Review Together. Answer independently.
    • Discussion questions- Share and Review

      Describe Ophelia’s tone toward Hamlet in these lines. What words demonstrate her tone?

      Describe Hamlet’s tone toward Ophelia in these lines. What words demonstrate his tone?

      What is Ophelia doing in lines 102–104?

      In line 105, how does Hamlet react to Ophelia’s “redeliver[ing]” his “remembrances”?

      How did the “words of so sweet breath” (line 107) affect the “things” (line 108) or “remembrances” according to Ophelia?

      Reread line 111: “Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.” What happens to rich gifts? Why?

      Of what is Ophelia accusing Hamlet in these lines? Why is she returning his “remembrances”?

      Describe Hamlet’s tone to Ophelia in these lines. Which words demonstrate his tone?

      Why might Hamlet ask if Ophelia is being truthful and just?

      What reasons might Ophelia have for lying or being unfair?

      How does Ophelia relate chastity and beauty in her response (lines 119–120)?

      Why might Hamlet be discussing chastity and beauty here? How do these ideas relate to lines 99–105?

      What is the cumulative impact of Hamlet’s words on his tone in lines 113–124?

      Why might Hamlet deny his love for Ophelia given everything he has said thus far in this dialogue?

      How does Ophelia respond to Hamlet throughout this passage? Describe her tone in lines 114–130. Cite specific words that demonstrate her tone.

      Homework- Finish the discussion questions. A sentence answer or less is fine.

  • Answer the following prompt-

    Reread Act 1.3, lines 13–48 (Laertes’s advice to Ophelia) and Act 3.1, lines 99–130 from this lesson. Then briefly explain the connections between Laertes’s and Hamlet’s ideas.

     

    Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #109 – “Hamlet” – Act 3 – To Be Or Not To Be analyzed.

Class Agenda #109- Hamlet – Act 3 – To Be or Not To Be

Homework- Charles will Check Your OPENING Journal

Opening Circle- Opening Reading I – 

    •  contumely (n.) – insulting display of contempt in words or actions; contemptuous or humiliating treatment
    •   consummation (n.) – completion
    •   calamity (n.) – a great misfortune or disaster
    •   heir (n.) – a person who inherits or has a right of inheritance in the property of another following the latter’s death
    • Journal- Use the 4 Vocabulary Words from The “To Be or Not To Be” Soliloquy in a sentence or two
      • Share at your tables.
  • Review Homework at Table (share 1 thing protocol)
  • Song- “Sunny Afternoon” The Kinks (3:32- 1966)

  • SLT-

    I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    What stands out about this SLT again?

  • Mini-Lesson – Interpreting meaning from the “To Be or Not To Be” Soliloquy 
  • Hamlet’s Third Soliloquy   –
    • Think about your understanding of this Soliloquy- What do we know about Hamlet’s Character so far?
    • Read the Soliloquy
  • Discussion Questions– Review Together. Answer independently.
    • Is Hamlet asking the question in a personal or universal sense?

      What does fortune mean?

      What are the “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune” mean, then?

      What might “a sea of troubles” be, and what does ending them mean?

      How would you summarize the problem Hamlet describes in these first five lines?

      With what issue is Hamlet struggling?

      How are death and sleep related to the problem Hamlet describes?

      What contrast has Hamlet has set up in this soliloquy?

      What is Hamlet afraid will happen in death?

      What is “the rub”?

      What is the effect of talking about death by using the phrase “shuffled off this mortal coil”?

      A calamity is “a great misfortune or disaster.” Reread lines 76–77: “There’s the respect / that makes calamity of so long life.” What does this mean?

      How do lines 76–77 shape your understanding of Hamlet’s view of life?

      How do the things that are listed in lines 78–82 (from “For who would bear the whips and scorns of time” to “the spurns / That patient merit of th’ unworthy takes”) support Hamlet’s statement: “There’s the respect / that makes calamity of so long life” (lines 76–77)?

      Look at lines 83–84 “When he himself might his quietus make / with a bare bodkin.” Refer to the explanatory notes. What do quietus and bare bodkin mean here? What is your understanding of the sentence?

      Discussion questions- Share and Review

  • Homework- Finish the discussion questions. A sentence answer or less is fine.

    Answer the following prompt-

    Hamlet’s attitude toward life and death, noting Shakespeare’s specific use of metaphor and language that is fresh, engaging, and beautiful.

     

    Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #108 – “Hamlet” – Quiz #6

Class Agenda #108- Hamlet – Quiz #6 – “To Be Or Not To Be”

Homework- Charles will Check – Summarizing Chunks of 2.2

Opening Circle- 1 Word to Describe your Break- Bonus if it’s Shakespearian. 

Announcements/Questions- Saturday School, How many feel prepared for today?

Length of the Song To Prepare

    • Hamlet. To be, or not to be- that is the question:
      Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer 1750
      The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
      Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
      And by opposing end them. To die- to sleep-
      No more; and by a sleep to say we end
      The heartache, and the thousand natural shocks 1755
      That flesh is heir to. ‘Tis a consummation
      Devoutly to be wish’d. To die- to sleep.
      To sleep- perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub!
      For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
      When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, 1760
      Must give us pause. There’s the respect
      That makes calamity of so long life.
      For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
      Th’ oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
      The pangs of despis’d love, the law’s delay, 1765
      The insolence of office, and the spurns
      That patient merit of th’ unworthy takes,
      When he himself might his quietus make
      With a bare bodkin? Who would these fardels bear,
      To grunt and sweat under a weary life, 1770
      But that the dread of something after death-
      The undiscover’d country, from whose bourn
      No traveller returns- puzzles the will,
      And makes us rather bear those ills we have
      Than fly to others that we know not of? 1775
      Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,
      And thus the native hue of resolution
      Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
      And enterprises of great pith and moment
      With this regard their currents turn awry 1780
      And lose the name of action.- Soft you now!
      The fair Ophelia!- Nymph, in thy orisons
      Be all my sins rememb’red.
    Song- "Mid-Night Hour" Talib Kwali ft. Estelle (2010; 4:39)
  • SLT- I can analyze character and author decisions in Act 2.2 of Hamlet. 
  • Quiz
  • EXIT- Evaluate your performance today. Who did it go? What worked? What didn’t work? What is your plan for future memorizing tasks?
  • Homework- Review the “To Be or Not to Be Speech”
    • Done from memory.
    • Grading-
      • 2- Speech is performed with a copy in front
      • 3- Can remember the whole soliloquy. If you get stuck, you check the paper.
      • 4- Can remember the whole soliloquy, no paper.
  • Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #107 – “Hamlet” – Memorizing Your Lines.

Class Agenda #107- Hamlet – Memorizing Your Lines

Homework- Charles will Check – Summarizing Chunks of 2.2

Opening Circle- Opening Reading (Optional)

  • To be, or not to be: that is the question:
    Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
    And by opposing end them?

    Spring Break Tracks #1 -“Everybody Like My Ting” Shatta Wale

  • SLT- I can analyze character and author decisions in Act 2.2 of Hamlet. 
  • Mini-Lesson – Quiz Review
  • Class Work-  Watching and Following along with Act 3 of Hamlet-
  • Watch as we Read ALONG!
    • Practice Hamlet.
    • Done from memory.
    • Grading-
      • 2- Speech is performed with a copy in front
      • 3- Can remember the whole soliloquy. If you get stuck, you check the paper.
      • 4- Can remember the whole soliloquy, no paper.
  • Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-