Class Agenda #117 – “Hamlet” – Act 4.4

Class Agenda #117- Hamlet – Act 4.4

Homework- Charles will Check Your HW- Summarizing Scenes

Opener- Vocabulary-

      • discourse (n.) – (in this context) power of thought
      •   fust (v.) – become moldy
      •   exhort (v.) – urge
        • dull (adj.) – not sharp; blunt
        •   occasions (n.) – particular times, especially as marked by certain circumstances or occurrences
        •   inform against (v.) – denounce; condemn; accuse
        •   bestial oblivion (n.) – mindlessness like beasts
        •   craven scruple (adj.) – cowardly hesitation
        •   gross (adj.) – very obvious or noticeable

        Song- “MCs Act Like They Don’t Know,” KRS-One (1995, 4:55)

     

    SLT- I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    What stands out about this SLT again?

  • Mini-Lesson – 
  • Summarizing the last few scenes in Hamlet-
    • Summary: Act IV, scene i

      Frantic after her confrontation with Hamlet, Gertrude hurries to Claudius, who is conferring with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. She asks to speak to the king alone. When Rosencrantz and Guildenstern exit, she tells Claudius about her encounter with Hamlet. She says that he is as mad as the sea during a violent storm; she also tells Claudius that Hamlet has killed Polonius. Aghast, the king notes that had he been concealed behind the arras, Hamlet would have killed him. Claudius wonders aloud how he will be able to handle this public crisis without damaging his hold on Denmark. He tells Gertrude that they must ship Hamlet to England at once and find a way to explain Hamlet’s misdeed to the court and to the people. He calls Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, tells them about the murder, and sends them to find Hamlet.

      Summary: Act IV, scene ii

      Elsewhere in Elsinore, Hamlet has just finished disposing of Polonius’s body, commenting that the corpse has been “safely stowed” (IV.ii.1). Rosencrantz and Guildenstern appear and ask what he has done with the body. Hamlet refuses to give them a straight answer, instead saying, “The body is with the king, but the king is not with the body” (IV.ii.25–26). Feigning offense at being questioned, he accuses them of being spies in the service of Claudius. He calls Rosencrantz a “sponge . . . that soaks up the king’s countenance, his rewards, his authorities,” and warns him that “when he needs what you have gleaned, it is but squeezing you, and, sponge, you shall be dry again” (IV.ii.11–19). At last he agrees to allow Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to escort him to Claudius.

      Summary: Act IV, scene iii

      The king speaks to a group of attendants, telling them of Polonius’s death and his intention to send Hamlet to England. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern appear with Hamlet, who is under guard. Pressed by Claudius to reveal the location of Polonius’s body, Hamlet is by turns inane, coy, and clever, saying that Polonius is being eaten by worms, and that the king could send a messenger to find Polonius in heaven or seek him in hell himself. Finally, Hamlet reveals that Polonius’s body is under the stairs near the castle lobby, and the king dispatches his attendants to look there. The king tells Hamlet that he must leave at once for England, and Hamlet enthusiastically agrees. He exits, and Claudius sends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to ensure that he boards the ship at once. Alone with his thoughts, Claudius states his hope that England will obey the sealed orders he has sent with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. The orders call for Prince Hamlet to be put to death.

      Class Read Aloud-

    • Act 4.4- Page 95
      • As We Read: Text Code
        • Put HighLight sections that connect to one of our major plot points
        • underline vocabulary words
        • Put Post It Notes on Any Questions You Have
      • Share Out Text Codes.

Discussion Questions-

  • To what occasions is Hamlet referring in his opening line, “How all occasions do inform against me” (line 34)?

    What effect are these events having on Hamlet?

    Based on your answer to the question above, what does the phrase inform against mean as it is used in this sentence?

    How does Shakespeare develop Hamlet’s character in lines 33–41?

    What two possible reasons does Hamlet give in line 42 for not having made a decision? Use the explanatory notes for the definitions of bestial oblivion and craven scruple.

    Hamlet describes his lack of action as “but one part wisdom / And ever three parts coward” in lines 44–46. What does this phrase reveal about Hamlet’s character in relation to the central idea of revenge?

    Who is the “delicate and tender prince” to whom Hamlet refers in line 51?

    How does Hamlet describe Fortinbras, his actions, and his goals in lines 50–56 (from “Witness this army of such mass and charge” through “To all that fortune, death, and danger dare / Even for an eggshell”)?

    How do these descriptions reveal Hamlet’s attitude toward Fortinbras?

    Homework-

Finish Reading this scene. Summarize it.

  • Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

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