Class Agenda #110 – “Hamlet” – Act 3.1 – Hamlet and Ophelia

Class Agenda #110- Hamlet – Act 3.1 – Hamlet and Ophelia

Homework- Charles will Check Your OPENING Journal AND HOMEWORK

Opening Circle- Opening Reading I – 

  • aught (v.) – anything whatever
  •   wax (v.) – assume a (specified) characteristic, quality, or state

    •   discourse (n.) – conversation
    •   bawd (n.) – prostitute
      • remembrances (n.) – greetings or gifts recalling or expressing friendship or affection
      •  long (adv.) – for or through a great extent of space, or, especially, time
      •   longèd (v.) – had an earnest or strong desire or craving; yearned
      •   rich (adj.) – of great value or worth; valuable
      •   poor (adj.) – small in worth
      •   chaste (adj.) – refraining from sexual intercourse that is regarded as contrary to morality or religion
      •   honest (adj.) – good and truthful; chaste
      •   fair (adj.) – marked by impartiality and honesty; beautiful

      Journal- Use ANY 6 Vocabulary Words from HAMLET in a sentence or two.

      • Share at your tables.
  • Review Homework at Table (share 1 thing protocol)
  • Song- “House Of The Rising Sun” The Animals (4:32- 1964)

  • SLT-

    I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    Review Last Nights Homework- Use the text to establish Hamlet’s attitude toward life and death, noting Shakespeare’s specific use of metaphor and language that is fresh, engaging, and beautiful.

    • In the play Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, the play’s protagonist, Hamlet’s attitude towards life and death is complicated. He views his current life as a state of inaction and suffering, and he chastises himself for his inaction- “There’s the respect… with a bare bodkin?” With this long section of figurative language, Hamlet explains how he wishes he could act, and that those who lead long lives do act, but he cannot.  Heis concerned that death could be even worse if he is to continue to suffer this torment in his dreams for all eternity.

 

  • Reading -Act 3.1 – Lines 31-63, Then Lines 99-130
    • Where to Claudius and Polonius “withdraw” to?
    • What topics to Hamlet and Ophelia discuss?
  • 99-130 Discussion Questions– Review Together. Answer independently.
    • Discussion questions- Share and Review

      Describe Ophelia’s tone toward Hamlet in these lines. What words demonstrate her tone?

      Describe Hamlet’s tone toward Ophelia in these lines. What words demonstrate his tone?

      What is Ophelia doing in lines 102–104?

      In line 105, how does Hamlet react to Ophelia’s “redeliver[ing]” his “remembrances”?

      How did the “words of so sweet breath” (line 107) affect the “things” (line 108) or “remembrances” according to Ophelia?

      Reread line 111: “Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.” What happens to rich gifts? Why?

      Of what is Ophelia accusing Hamlet in these lines? Why is she returning his “remembrances”?

      Describe Hamlet’s tone to Ophelia in these lines. Which words demonstrate his tone?

      Why might Hamlet ask if Ophelia is being truthful and just?

      What reasons might Ophelia have for lying or being unfair?

      How does Ophelia relate chastity and beauty in her response (lines 119–120)?

      Why might Hamlet be discussing chastity and beauty here? How do these ideas relate to lines 99–105?

      What is the cumulative impact of Hamlet’s words on his tone in lines 113–124?

      Why might Hamlet deny his love for Ophelia given everything he has said thus far in this dialogue?

      How does Ophelia respond to Hamlet throughout this passage? Describe her tone in lines 114–130. Cite specific words that demonstrate her tone.

      Homework- Finish the discussion questions. A sentence answer or less is fine.

  • Answer the following prompt-

    Reread Act 1.3, lines 13–48 (Laertes’s advice to Ophelia) and Act 3.1, lines 99–130 from this lesson. Then briefly explain the connections between Laertes’s and Hamlet’s ideas.

     

    Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

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