Class Agenda #109 – “Hamlet” – Act 3 – To Be Or Not To Be analyzed.

Class Agenda #109- Hamlet – Act 3 – To Be or Not To Be

Homework- Charles will Check Your OPENING Journal

Opening Circle- Opening Reading I – 

    •  contumely (n.) – insulting display of contempt in words or actions; contemptuous or humiliating treatment
    •   consummation (n.) – completion
    •   calamity (n.) – a great misfortune or disaster
    •   heir (n.) – a person who inherits or has a right of inheritance in the property of another following the latter’s death
    • Journal- Use the 4 Vocabulary Words from The “To Be or Not To Be” Soliloquy in a sentence or two
      • Share at your tables.
  • Review Homework at Table (share 1 thing protocol)
  • Song- “Sunny Afternoon” The Kinks (3:32- 1966)

  • SLT-

    I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    What stands out about this SLT again?

  • Mini-Lesson – Interpreting meaning from the “To Be or Not To Be” Soliloquy 
  • Hamlet’s Third Soliloquy   –
    • Think about your understanding of this Soliloquy- What do we know about Hamlet’s Character so far?
    • Read the Soliloquy
  • Discussion Questions– Review Together. Answer independently.
    • Is Hamlet asking the question in a personal or universal sense?

      What does fortune mean?

      What are the “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune” mean, then?

      What might “a sea of troubles” be, and what does ending them mean?

      How would you summarize the problem Hamlet describes in these first five lines?

      With what issue is Hamlet struggling?

      How are death and sleep related to the problem Hamlet describes?

      What contrast has Hamlet has set up in this soliloquy?

      What is Hamlet afraid will happen in death?

      What is “the rub”?

      What is the effect of talking about death by using the phrase “shuffled off this mortal coil”?

      A calamity is “a great misfortune or disaster.” Reread lines 76–77: “There’s the respect / that makes calamity of so long life.” What does this mean?

      How do lines 76–77 shape your understanding of Hamlet’s view of life?

      How do the things that are listed in lines 78–82 (from “For who would bear the whips and scorns of time” to “the spurns / That patient merit of th’ unworthy takes”) support Hamlet’s statement: “There’s the respect / that makes calamity of so long life” (lines 76–77)?

      Look at lines 83–84 “When he himself might his quietus make / with a bare bodkin.” Refer to the explanatory notes. What do quietus and bare bodkin mean here? What is your understanding of the sentence?

      Discussion questions- Share and Review

  • Homework- Finish the discussion questions. A sentence answer or less is fine.

    Answer the following prompt-

    Hamlet’s attitude toward life and death, noting Shakespeare’s specific use of metaphor and language that is fresh, engaging, and beautiful.

     

    Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

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