Monthly Archives: April 2015

Class Agenda #120 – “Hamlet” – Act 4.7

Class Agenda #120- Hamlet – Act 4.7 

Homework- Charles will Check Your HW- Summarizing Scenes

Opener- Song- “Ya Mama” The Pharcyde (1992, 4:12)

Opener- 15 Minutes

  • Take Out Your Copy of Hamlet and Turn to Act 4.7 (Page 107-113)
  • In this scene, Hamlet decided not to go to England and returned to the palace. Therefore, Claudius is plotting to use Lartes to kill Hamlet and we learn of Ophelia’s suicide.
  • Begin Reading Independently
  • Text Code-
    • Highlight passages that relate to one of our Central Themes of mortality, revenge, madness, and action vs. inaction.

Whole Class- Focusing on a few sections- Here is the visual-

  • Lines 130-185
    • Think/Pair/Share- Is Claudius manipulating Lartes in this section? Explain.
  • Lines 188-215
    • Think/Pair/Share- What is strange or stands out about this section?
  •  Partner work- Work in groups of 2-3 to come to a common agreement on the following:
    • Which central ideas are most apparent in Act 4.7?
      •  What passages or lines best support your central ideas?
    • Evaluate Queen Gertrude’s description of Ophelia’s suicide-
      • What stands out as strange about this scene, and what are some possible explanations for Shakespeare making this scene the way it is?
  • SLT- I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

  • Standards
  • 1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #119 – “Hamlet” – Act 4.4 II

Class Agenda #119- Hamlet – Act 4.4 II

Homework- Charles will Check Your HW- Summarizing Scenes

Opener- Song- “Ritual Union” Little Dragon (2011, 3:30)

Journal- Respond to each of the following in 2-3 sentences. 8 Minutes

  • What is the importance of text-coding?
  • What is the importance of trying difficult or challenging questions?
  • What is the importance of having conversations with your classmates about what you’re learning?

Whip around protocol- 15 Minutes

  • Facilitator- involves all students including self.
  • Participants- Participate in the discussion and engage.
  • Hippopotamus- Asks tough questions and naysays what’s going on.
  • Note Taker and Sharerouter- Takes notes and Shares out

Protocol- 

  • Everyone whips around and shares their thinking for questions 1
  • Facilitator has group work to come up with a common answer.
  • Hippopotamus- asks a tough question that challenges the groups thinking.
  • Group comes to a successful answer to that question, or if they can’t question is posed for the whole class.

Repeat for second and third question.

Whole Class Share-

Lets see if we can come to a solid consensus.

  • SLT- I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    What stands out about this SLT again?

  • Review This Handout-
  •  Screen Shot 2015-04-29 at 8.38.49 AM

 

Directions-

  • In groups of 2- Paraphrase the selections from the text in the box.
  • In The Notes Box- Explain which Central Idea this quote is best connected to.

Revision- Revise as we go, and 3 minutes to revise at the end.

Review II

Discussion Questions- To Be Done Individually or in pairs.

  • To what occasions is Hamlet referring in his opening line, “How all occasions do inform against me” (line 34)?

    What effect are these events having on Hamlet?

    Based on your answer to the question above, what does the phrase inform against mean as it is used in this sentence?

    How does Shakespeare develop Hamlet’s character in lines 33–41?

    What two possible reasons does Hamlet give in line 42 for not having made a decision? Use the explanatory notes for the definitions of bestial oblivion and craven scruple.

    Hamlet describes his lack of action as “but one part wisdom / And ever three parts coward” in lines 44–46. What does this phrase reveal about Hamlet’s character in relation to the central idea of revenge?

    Who is the “delicate and tender prince” to whom Hamlet refers in line 51?

    How does Hamlet describe Fortinbras, his actions, and his goals in lines 50–56 (from “Witness this army of such mass and charge” through “To all that fortune, death, and danger dare / Even for an eggshell”)?

    How do these descriptions reveal Hamlet’s attitude toward Fortinbras?

    What is the meaning of “Rightly to be great / Is not to stir without great argument” (lines 56-57)?

  • According to Hamlet’s definition of what it means to be great, is he great or not? What evidence from the play supports your answer?

    What does Hamlet mean when he says he has “a mother stained” (line 60)?

    What is the relationship between “this army” that Hamlet mentions in line 50 and the “twenty thousand men” he mentions in line 63?

    Based on Hamlet’s definition of greatness in lines 56–59, is Fortinbras great?

    How does Hamlet’s expression of shame in line 62 develop central ideas that Shakespeare introduced earlier in the play?

    Homework-

    Finish Reading Act 4 on Your own. Write a summary of what you read.

  • Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #118 – “Hamlet” – Act 4.4 II

Class Agenda #118- Hamlet – Act 4.4 II

Homework- Charles will Check Your HW- Summarizing Scenes

Opener- Watch Meeting Fortinbras and Hamlet’s 5th Soliloquy

Journal- Respond to the prompt in 2-3 sentences. Be sure to use a clear piece of evidence and tie the evidence to your point.

How is Fortinbras a foil to Hamlet? 

  1. Most of us have heard the word “foil” used in a literary context, and when used to describe a character, it means that that character serves to highlight one or more attributes of another character, often the protagonist, by providing a contrast. In the Harry Potter series, Draco Malfoy is a foil to Harry Potter.

Song- “Waves” Electric Guest (2012, 3:07)

  •  

    SLT- I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    What stands out about this SLT again?

  • Mini-Lesson – 5 Minutes
    • Class Read Aloud- Hamlet’s Soliloquy
    • Act 4.4- Page 97
      • As We Read: Text Code
        • HighLight sections that connect to one of our major plot points
        • underline vocabulary words
      • Share Out Text Codes.

Pair Work- 8 Mintes

In groups of 2- Paraphrase the selections from the text in the box.

In The Notes Box- Explain which Central Idea this quote is best connected to.

Share the Pairs- 5 Minutes

  • Pair up with another pair.
  • Share your work
  • If there are differences, discuss what they were.

Class Share

Discussion Questions- To Be Done Individually or in pairs.

  • To what occasions is Hamlet referring in his opening line, “How all occasions do inform against me” (line 34)?

    What effect are these events having on Hamlet?

    Based on your answer to the question above, what does the phrase inform against mean as it is used in this sentence?

    How does Shakespeare develop Hamlet’s character in lines 33–41?

    What two possible reasons does Hamlet give in line 42 for not having made a decision? Use the explanatory notes for the definitions of bestial oblivion and craven scruple.

    Hamlet describes his lack of action as “but one part wisdom / And ever three parts coward” in lines 44–46. What does this phrase reveal about Hamlet’s character in relation to the central idea of revenge?

    Who is the “delicate and tender prince” to whom Hamlet refers in line 51?

    How does Hamlet describe Fortinbras, his actions, and his goals in lines 50–56 (from “Witness this army of such mass and charge” through “To all that fortune, death, and danger dare / Even for an eggshell”)?

    How do these descriptions reveal Hamlet’s attitude toward Fortinbras?

    What is the meaning of “Rightly to be great / Is not to stir without great argument” (lines 56-57)?

  • According to Hamlet’s definition of what it means to be great, is he great or not? What evidence from the play supports your answer?

    What does Hamlet mean when he says he has “a mother stained” (line 60)?

    What is the relationship between “this army” that Hamlet mentions in line 50 and the “twenty thousand men” he mentions in line 63?

    Based on Hamlet’s definition of greatness in lines 56–59, is Fortinbras great?

    How does Hamlet’s expression of shame in line 62 develop central ideas that Shakespeare introduced earlier in the play?

    Homework-

    Finish Discussion Questions. Pay special attention to those in Bold.

  • Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #117 – “Hamlet” – Act 4.4

Class Agenda #117- Hamlet – Act 4.4

Homework- Charles will Check Your HW- Summarizing Scenes

Opener- Vocabulary-

      • discourse (n.) – (in this context) power of thought
      •   fust (v.) – become moldy
      •   exhort (v.) – urge
        • dull (adj.) – not sharp; blunt
        •   occasions (n.) – particular times, especially as marked by certain circumstances or occurrences
        •   inform against (v.) – denounce; condemn; accuse
        •   bestial oblivion (n.) – mindlessness like beasts
        •   craven scruple (adj.) – cowardly hesitation
        •   gross (adj.) – very obvious or noticeable

        Song- “MCs Act Like They Don’t Know,” KRS-One (1995, 4:55)

     

    SLT- I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    What stands out about this SLT again?

  • Mini-Lesson – 
  • Summarizing the last few scenes in Hamlet-
    • Summary: Act IV, scene i

      Frantic after her confrontation with Hamlet, Gertrude hurries to Claudius, who is conferring with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. She asks to speak to the king alone. When Rosencrantz and Guildenstern exit, she tells Claudius about her encounter with Hamlet. She says that he is as mad as the sea during a violent storm; she also tells Claudius that Hamlet has killed Polonius. Aghast, the king notes that had he been concealed behind the arras, Hamlet would have killed him. Claudius wonders aloud how he will be able to handle this public crisis without damaging his hold on Denmark. He tells Gertrude that they must ship Hamlet to England at once and find a way to explain Hamlet’s misdeed to the court and to the people. He calls Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, tells them about the murder, and sends them to find Hamlet.

      Summary: Act IV, scene ii

      Elsewhere in Elsinore, Hamlet has just finished disposing of Polonius’s body, commenting that the corpse has been “safely stowed” (IV.ii.1). Rosencrantz and Guildenstern appear and ask what he has done with the body. Hamlet refuses to give them a straight answer, instead saying, “The body is with the king, but the king is not with the body” (IV.ii.25–26). Feigning offense at being questioned, he accuses them of being spies in the service of Claudius. He calls Rosencrantz a “sponge . . . that soaks up the king’s countenance, his rewards, his authorities,” and warns him that “when he needs what you have gleaned, it is but squeezing you, and, sponge, you shall be dry again” (IV.ii.11–19). At last he agrees to allow Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to escort him to Claudius.

      Summary: Act IV, scene iii

      The king speaks to a group of attendants, telling them of Polonius’s death and his intention to send Hamlet to England. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern appear with Hamlet, who is under guard. Pressed by Claudius to reveal the location of Polonius’s body, Hamlet is by turns inane, coy, and clever, saying that Polonius is being eaten by worms, and that the king could send a messenger to find Polonius in heaven or seek him in hell himself. Finally, Hamlet reveals that Polonius’s body is under the stairs near the castle lobby, and the king dispatches his attendants to look there. The king tells Hamlet that he must leave at once for England, and Hamlet enthusiastically agrees. He exits, and Claudius sends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to ensure that he boards the ship at once. Alone with his thoughts, Claudius states his hope that England will obey the sealed orders he has sent with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. The orders call for Prince Hamlet to be put to death.

      Class Read Aloud-

    • Act 4.4- Page 95
      • As We Read: Text Code
        • Put HighLight sections that connect to one of our major plot points
        • underline vocabulary words
        • Put Post It Notes on Any Questions You Have
      • Share Out Text Codes.

Discussion Questions-

  • To what occasions is Hamlet referring in his opening line, “How all occasions do inform against me” (line 34)?

    What effect are these events having on Hamlet?

    Based on your answer to the question above, what does the phrase inform against mean as it is used in this sentence?

    How does Shakespeare develop Hamlet’s character in lines 33–41?

    What two possible reasons does Hamlet give in line 42 for not having made a decision? Use the explanatory notes for the definitions of bestial oblivion and craven scruple.

    Hamlet describes his lack of action as “but one part wisdom / And ever three parts coward” in lines 44–46. What does this phrase reveal about Hamlet’s character in relation to the central idea of revenge?

    Who is the “delicate and tender prince” to whom Hamlet refers in line 51?

    How does Hamlet describe Fortinbras, his actions, and his goals in lines 50–56 (from “Witness this army of such mass and charge” through “To all that fortune, death, and danger dare / Even for an eggshell”)?

    How do these descriptions reveal Hamlet’s attitude toward Fortinbras?

    Homework-

Finish Reading this scene. Summarize it.

  • Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #116 – “Hamlet” – Act 3.5-4.2

Class Agenda #116- Hamlet – Act 3.5-4.2

Homework- Charles will Check Your OPENING Journal

Opening Circle- Group Juggle… yeah, it’s Friday… why not?

    • Get your Computers
    • 15 Minutes Finish Your Hamlet Packet.
    • Song- “Recognize” PartyNextDoor Ft- Drake (2014, 5:14)

     

    SLT- I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    What stands out about this SLT again?

  • Mini-Lesson – 

Continue Hamlet Film 

Homework-

Finish Act 3. Read the First 3 Scenes of Act 4 on YOUR OWN.

Summarize this section. Due On Monday!

P

  • Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #114 – “Hamlet” – Act 3.4 – Hamlet and Gertrude

Class Agenda #114- Hamlet – Act 3.4 – Hamlet and Gertrude

Homework- Charles will Check Your OPENING Journal

Opening Circle- Vocabulary (10 Minutes) USE THE OTHER WORDS

    • modesty (n.) – regard for decency of behavior, speech, dress, etc.
    •   virtue (n.) – goodness
    •   hypocrite (n.) – a person who pretends to have virtues, principles, or moral or religious beliefs that he or she does not actually possess, especially a person whose actions belie stated beliefs
    •   dicers (n.) – gamblers
    •   oaths (n.) – promises
    •   counterfeit presentment (n.) – representation in portraits
    •   Hyperion (n.) – the sun god, often said to be the most beautiful of the gods
      • Jove (n.) – also called Jupiter, the king of the gods
      •   Mars (n.) – the god of war
      •   station (n.) – position or way of standing
      •   Mercury (n.) – winged messenger of the gods
      •   ear (n.) – the seed-bearing part of a cereal plant, like wheat or corn
      •   batten (v.) – thrive by feeding; grow fat
      •   moor (n.) – broad area of open land that is not good for farming
      •   heyday (n.) – state of excitement
      •   sense (n.) – perception through sight, hearing, touch, etc.
      •   apoplexed (adj.) – paralyzed
      •   cozened (v.) – tricked
      •   hoodman-blind (n.) – a game in which one of the players is blindfolded and taunted (blind man’s bluff)
      •   sans (prep.) – without
      •   so mope (v.) – be so stunned
      •   mutine (v.) – incite rebellion
      •   grainèd (adj.) – indelible (grain was a “fast” or permanent dye)

      Journal- Use the vocabulary words in a sentence about Hamlet

    • Song- “Return of The Simba” J-Cole, 2011 (4:12)

     

    SLT- I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    What stands out about this SLT again?

Pair Work- Finish Packet. Teacher will circulate.

Continue Hamlet Film if more time.

Homework-

Finish Act 3. Read the First 3 Scenes of Act 4 on YOUR OWN.

Summarize this section.

P

  • Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-

Class Agenda #114 – “Hamlet” – Act 3.4 – Hamlet and Gertrude

Class Agenda #114- Hamlet – Act 3.4 – Hamlet and Gertrude

Homework- Charles will Check Your OPENING Journal

Opening Circle- Vocabulary (10 Minutes)

    • modesty (n.) – regard for decency of behavior, speech, dress, etc.
    •   virtue (n.) – goodness
    •   hypocrite (n.) – a person who pretends to have virtues, principles, or moral or religious beliefs that he or she does not actually possess, especially a person whose actions belie stated beliefs
    •   dicers (n.) – gamblers
    •   oaths (n.) – promises
    •   counterfeit presentment (n.) – representation in portraits
    •   Hyperion (n.) – the sun god, often said to be the most beautiful of the gods
      • Jove (n.) – also called Jupiter, the king of the gods
      •   Mars (n.) – the god of war
      •   station (n.) – position or way of standing
      •   Mercury (n.) – winged messenger of the gods
      •   ear (n.) – the seed-bearing part of a cereal plant, like wheat or corn
      •   batten (v.) – thrive by feeding; grow fat
      •   moor (n.) – broad area of open land that is not good for farming
      •   heyday (n.) – state of excitement
      •   sense (n.) – perception through sight, hearing, touch, etc.
      •   apoplexed (adj.) – paralyzed
      •   cozened (v.) – tricked
      •   hoodman-blind (n.) – a game in which one of the players is blindfolded and taunted (blind man’s bluff)
      •   sans (prep.) – without
      •   so mope (v.) – be so stunned
      •   mutine (v.) – incite rebellion
      •   grainèd (adj.) – indelible (grain was a “fast” or permanent dye)

      Journal- Use the vocabulary words in a sentence about Hamlet

    • Song- “Stand By Me” Otis Redding, 1964 (2:53)

     

    SLT- I Can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.

    What stands out about this SLT again?

  • Mini-Lesson – Hamlet Act 3.4
  • Read this scene together.
  • As We Read: Text Code
    • Put HighLight sections that connect to one of our major plot points
    • underline vocabulary words
    • Put Post It Notes on Any Questions You Have
  • Watch-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOjpvNPr3JU

Discussion Questions-

  • What does the action of “wringing your hands” look like? What is Gertrude doing? (Act it out.) Why might she be doing this? Hint: What has Hamlet just done?

    Given the meaning of “wringing your hands,” what does Hamlet mean when he says he will “wring [Gertrude’s] heart” (line 43)?

    What familiar words or word parts are in the word penetrable (line 44)? How do these words or word parts help the reader define penetrable?

    Homework- 

    Answer the following prompt-

    How does Shakespeare develop Gertrude’s character in this scene? Be sure to analyze evidence from the text.

     

    Standards

    1) I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

    2) I can Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

    I can Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed)

    I can initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

    I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

    Hamlet full text-