Monthly Archives: February 2015

Class Agenda #86 – “Hamlet” – Quiz #1

Opener – Group Juggle

Class Agenda #86- Hamlet Act Quiz #1

Homework Check- We’ll do it on the computer

Opening Reading-

  • Level 4 Response

    Introduce a well-reasoned claim regarding the development and interaction of two or more central ideas.

    Demonstrate a complex analysis of how the central ideas interact and build on one another.

    and/or

    Demonstrate a thoughtful analysis of how the structure of text(s) contributes to overall meaning, aesthetic impact, clarity, or persuasiveness.

    Distribute Quiz

    Act 1.2 — DO NOT PUT YOUR NAME ON THIS.

    #890- “Love That Girl ” Rafael Saadiq (3:03  —  2008)

    Homework-

    Reread all of Act 1.2  and write an objective summary, using any of the vocabulary words as appropriate.

    # filial (adj.) – of, pertaining to, or befitting a son or daughter

      obsequious (adj.) – (in the Elizabethan context) obedient; dutiful

      obstinate (adj.) – firmly or stubbornly adhering to one’s purpose, opinion

      impious (adj.) – not pious or religious; lacking reverence for God, religious practices, etc.

    condolement (n.) – sorrow

      vulgar (adj.) – characterized by ignorance of or lack of good breeding or taste; indecent; obscene; lewd; crude, coarse, unrefined; of, pertaining to, or constituting the ordinary people in a society; current, popular, common
    Here is the scene-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Class Agenda #85 – “Hamlet” – Act 1.2 II

Class Agenda #85- Hamlet Act 1.2 II

Homework Check- Charles will come around and check. Just show him.

Get Out: Your Notebook, Copy Of Hamlet

Opening Reading-

  • KING CLAUDIUS

    Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother’s death The memory be green, and that it us befitted

    To bear our hearts in grief, and our whole kingdom To be contracted in one brow of woe,

    Yet so far hath discretion fought with nature
    That we with wisest sorrow think on him
    Together with remembrance of ourselves. Therefore our sometime sister, now our queen,
    Th’ imperial jointress to this warlike state,
    Have we (as ’twere with a defeated joy,
    With an auspicious and a dropping eye,
    With mirth in funeral and with dirge in marriage, In equal scale weighing delight and dole)
    Taken to wife. Nor have we herein barred
    Your better wisdoms, which have freely gone With this affair along. For all, our thanks.
    Now follows that you know. Young Fortinbras, Holding a weak supposal of our worth
    Or thinking by our late dear brother’s death
    Our state to be disjoint and out of frame, Colleaguèd with this dream of his advantage,
    He hath not failed to pester us with message Importing the surrender of those lands
    Lost by his father, with all bonds of law,
    To our most valiant brother—so much for him. Now for ourself and for this time of meeting.
    Thus much the business is: we have here writ
    To Norway, uncle of young Fortinbras,
    Who, impotent and bedrid, scarcely hears

    Of this his nephew’s purpose, to suppress
    His further gait herein, in that the levies,
    The lists, and full proportions are all made
    Out of his subject; and we here dispatch
    You, good Cornelius, and you, Voltemand, For bearers of this greeting to old Norway, Giving to you no further personal power
    To business with the King more than the scope Of these dilated articles allow.

    Journal-

    Translate the FIRST 4 LINES of King Claudius’s monologue into language that you’re more comfortable with.

    After you translate, summarize the gist of what the king is saying.

#889- “How Long Do I Have To Wait For You? ” Sharon Jones and The Dap Kings (4:04  —  2005)

Standards

  •      

    I Can Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

    • Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).
    • Consult general or specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

    Assessment(s)

    Student learning will be assessed via a Quick Write at the end of the lesson. Students answer the following prompt, citing textual evidence to support analysis and inferences drawn from the text.

     How do specific word choices in Claudius’s monologue impact the development of Hamlet’s character?

     

 

Part II- Mini-Lesson- 

Breaking down Shakespearean Language.

1. Get into the right mindset. Feel the mood of the play. Never assume that this is too difficult for you anyway. Going through the text step by step will enable you to understand it.

2. Think about the Performance. When we see the performance, they’re just people (meaning they’re doing things and saying things.)

3. Get used to the old-fashioned language. Whenever you hear the word “thou,” thy” or “thee”, that means “you,” “your,” or “you”–singular. When you hear “art”, that means “are”. When you hear anything that ends in “-st”, don’t freak out. Shakespeare adds “-st” to any word that goes with “thou”, thus “mayst not” = “may not”. Shakespeare also likes to take out syllables to make the line flow smoother–example: “o’ th’ ” would translate to “on the”.

4. Remember that this is a play that is written like a poem. There are multiple similes, metaphors, oxymorons, etc…

5. If you’re Performing Shakespeare, be sure to enunciate (speak out entire words rather than a slur of words)

Example:

This:

Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother’s death The memory be green, and that it us befitted

To bear our hearts in grief, and our whole kingdom To be contracted in one brow of woe,

In My Mind, Becomes:

My brother (King) Hamlet just died and it’s

normal to be sad, Our whole kingdom is sad together.

Looking at the opening of Act 1.2-

Part III Practice-

  • Look at King Claudius’s Monologue (From the opening reading)
  • Spend 8 Minutes in your groups, translating it into your own words.
  • Share out your translation

Part IV- Reexamining Claudius’s Second Monologue

  • In small groups at your tables: Finish Individually for HW If Not…
    • Read Lines 90-93
    • Discuss the following, Taking Notes in your notebook as you do.
  1. In lines 90–92, who is Hamlet mourning?
  2. What are the first two adjectives that the King uses to describe Hamlet’s nature?
  3. Evaluate Claudius’s sincerity about Hamlet’s “sweet and commendable” nature. What evidence from the text supports your position?

Continue in Groups on Lines 93-96

  1. How does Claudius view the loss of Hamlet’s father? Use evidence from the text to support your position.
  2. How does Claudius emphasize his point in lines 93–94?

Vocabulary Check In- Impious and Obstinate 

Continue on Lines 96-101

  1. Which familiar word do you see in condolement?
  2. What does it mean to send condolences?
  3. What does Claudius mean by condolement on line 97?
  4. Using these definitions, paraphrase lines 93–98. What is Claudius saying to Hamlet?
  5. Define the word “grief” (line 98).
  6. What idea links the phrases “mourning duties” (line 92), “filial obligation” (line 95), and “obsequious sorrow” (line 96)?
  7. What can you infer about Claudius’s view of grief and its relationship to duty?
  8. In lines 96–98, of what fault does Claudius accuse Hamlet? Cite two words that support your response.
  9. What does Claudius mean when he calls Hamlet’s grief “unmanly” in line 98?

Lines 102-105

  1. In line 102, what does Claudius mean by “what we know must be”?
  2. How is the word vulgar used in line 103?
  3. Which other word with similar meaning does Claudius use in lines 102–103? What is the impact of using these two words close together?
  4. Where earlier in the speech does Claudius make a similar point?
  5. What does Claudius’s repeated insistence upon death as an everyday occurrence imply about Hamlet’s character?

Lines 105-106 

  1. What is the impact of the repetition of the word “fault” in lines 105–106 on Claudius’s depiction of Hamlet?
  2. What is Hamlet’s “fault”?
  3. Against what and whom is this fault committed?

Lines 107-110

  1. To what concept does Claudius appeal in lines 107–110?
  2. In line 107, how does Hamlet’s grief appear “to reason,” according to Claudius?
  3. What is the reasonable attitude towards death, according to Claudius?
  4. If you could translate the speech so far into one sentence, what would it be?

Homework- 

Finish The Group Work on Your own.

Reread Lines 90-110 and address the following writing prompt

  • To what standards is Claudius holding Hamlet? Cite at least two pieces of textual evidence to support your claim.

 

Assessment-

Quick Write- Answer the following prompt in about a paragraph.

How do specific word choices in Claudius’s monologue impact the development of Hamlet’s character?

  • Look at your text and notes to find evidence

 

Class Agenda #84 – “Hamlet” – Act 1.2 I

Class Agenda #84- Hamlet Act 1.2 I

Homework Check- Charles will come around and check. Just show him.

Opening Reading-

“…the most constructive way of resolving conflicts is to avoid them.”
-Felix Frankfurter (1952)

JOURNAL –  At the end of Act 1.1 of Hamlet, Horatio makes a decision-

HORATIO

So have I heard and do in part believe it.
But look, the morn in russet mantle clad Walks o’er the dew of yon high eastward hill. Break we our watch up, and by my advice Let us impart what we have seen tonight Unto young Hamlet; for, upon my life,This spirit, dumb to us, will speak to him.
Do you consent we shall acquaint him with it As needful in our loves, fitting our duty?

  • Analyze this decision as it pertains/relates to the quote by Mr. Frankfurter.
  • Remember- to Analyze something is to:
    • Put it in your own words
    • Explain how it connects to the overarching point/thesis/topic/quote

#888- “ValerieAmy Winehouse (3:54  —  2008)

Standards

  •      

    RL.11-12.5

    I Can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

    Assessment(s)

    Student learning will be assessed via a Quick Write at the end of the lesson. Students answer the following prompt, citing textual evidence to support analysis and inferences drawn from the text.

     How do specific word choices in Claudius’s monologue impact the development of Hamlet’s character?

    Hamlet Vocabulary- 

# filial (adj.) – of, pertaining to, or befitting a son or daughter

  obsequious (adj.) – (in the Elizabethan context) obedient; dutiful

   obstinate (adj.) – firmly or stubbornly adhering to one’s purpose, opinion

  impious (adj.) – not pious or religious; lacking reverence for God, religious practices, etc.

condolement (n.) – sorrow

  vulgar (adj.) – characterized by ignorance of or lack of good breeding or taste; indecent; obscene; lewd; crude, coarse, unrefined; of, pertaining to, or constituting the ordinary people in a society; current, popular, common

 

Part II- Mini-Mini Lesson- 

What is a Monologue?

Part III – Reading!

“Hamlet” By William Shakespeare (1603).

  • 11.1.2_hamlet (1)
  • If you haven’t”
    • Save to Your Desktop and Title it with Your Name
    • Have the reading and your notebook accessible.
  • In small groups at your tables:
    • Read Lines 90-93
    • Discuss the following, Taking Notes in your notebook as you do.
  1. In lines 90–92, who is Hamlet mourning?
  2. What are the first two adjectives that the King uses to describe Hamlet’s nature?
  3. Evaluate Claudius’s sincerity about Hamlet’s “sweet and commendable” nature. What evidence from the text supports your position?

Interruption:

  • Look at the phrases “bound in filial obligation” and “obsequious sorrow.”
  • Connect this to our Vocabulary list

Continue in Groups on Lines 93-96

  1. How does Claudius view the loss of Hamlet’s father? Use evidence from the text to support your position.
  2. How does Claudius emphasize his point in lines 93–94?

Vocabulary Check In- Impious and Obstinate 

Continue on Lines 96-101

  1. Which familiar word do you see in condolement?
  2. What does it mean to send condolences?
  3. What does Claudius mean by condolement on line 97?
  4. Using these definitions, paraphrase lines 93–98. What is Claudius saying to Hamlet?
  5. Define the word “grief” (line 98).
  6. What idea links the phrases “mourning duties” (line 92), “filial obligation” (line 95), and “obsequious sorrow” (line 96)?
  7. What can you infer about Claudius’s view of grief and its relationship to duty?
  8. In lines 96–98, of what fault does Claudius accuse Hamlet? Cite two words that support your response.
  9. What does Claudius mean when he calls Hamlet’s grief “unmanly” in line 98?

Lines 102-105

  1. In line 102, what does Claudius mean by “what we know must be”?
  2. How is the word vulgar used in line 103?
  3. Which other word with similar meaning does Claudius use in lines 102–103? What is the impact of using these two words close together?
  4. Where earlier in the speech does Claudius make a similar point?
  5. What does Claudius’s repeated insistence upon death as an everyday occurrence imply about Hamlet’s character?

Lines 105-106 

  1. What is the impact of the repetition of the word “fault” in lines 105–106 on Claudius’s depiction of Hamlet?
  2. What is Hamlet’s “fault”?
  3. Against what and whom is this fault committed?

Lines 107-110

  1. To what concept does Claudius appeal in lines 107–110?
  2. In line 107, how does Hamlet’s grief appear “to reason,” according to Claudius?
  3. What is the reasonable attitude towards death, according to Claudius?
  4. If you could translate the speech so far into one sentence, what would it be?

Quick Write- Answer the following prompt in about a paragraph.

How do specific word choices in Claudius’s monologue impact the development of Hamlet’s character?

  • Look at your text and notes to find evidence

Homework- Reread Lines 90-110 and address the following writing prompt

  • To what standards is Claudius holding Hamlet? Cite at least two pieces of textual evidence to support your claim.

 

Class Agenda #83 – “Hamlet” – Act 1.1 Continued

Class Agenda #83- Hamlet Act 1.1 Continued

Homework Check- Charles will come around and check. Just show him.

Opening Reading-

Horatio-
What art thou that usurp’st this time of night
Together with that fair and warlike form
In which the majesty of buried Denmark
Did sometimes march? By heaven, I charge thee, speak.

JOURNAL-  Why might the “majesty of buried Denmark” be in a “fair and warlike form”?

#1112- “Happy Feet” Cab Calloway (2:54  —  1929)

Standards

  •      

    RL.11-12.5

    I Can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

    Agenda-

    1. Introduction of Lesson Agenda
    2. Homework Accountability
    3. Masterful Reading
    4. Act 1.1, Complete
    5. Quick Write
    6. Film Viewing
    7. Closing

     

  • Hamlet Vocabulary- 
  • late (adj.) – living comparatively recently, now deceased
  •   unfold (v.) – reveal or display
  •   apparition (n.) – a supernatural appearance of a person or thing, especially a ghost
  •   assail (v.) – attack vigorously or violently; assault
  •   fortified (adj.) – protected or strengthened against attack
  •   stalks (v.) – walks with measured, stiff, or haughty strides
  • harrows (v.) – disturbs keenly or painfully; distresses the mind or feelings

    Mini Lesson-

  • Attacking Critical Reading Questions- Think Aloud for the following question.
  • Describe Barnardo and Francisco’s tone in the first five lines. What words demonstrate their tone?

  • Steps
    1. Read the question and assess the verbs and nouns
    2. Form a plan in your head.
    3. If you need to, reread the lines and attack them with your plan.
  • Model-
    • Describe Barnardo and Francisco’s tone in the first five lines. What words demonstrate their tone?
  • Verbs -Describe, demonstrate
  • Nouns- tone, first five lines, words
  • Plan- I know a tone is being established in the first five lines; figure out what that tone is.
  • Reread-
    • Barnardo  Who’s there?
    • Francisco  Nay, answer me. Stand and unfold yourself.
    • Barnardo  Long live the King!
    • Francisco  Barnardo
    • Barnardo  He
  • Determine which words or punctuation are different and focus on them. (who’s there?, Nay, answer me, !)
  • Establish an answer- The tone of the opening 5 lines is worried or unsure. You can tell just from the first line of the play, “who’s there/Nay answer me” that both Barnardo and Francisco are on edge and unsure of their surroundings.

Part II – Reading!

“Hamlet” By William Shakespeare (1603).

  • 11.1.2_hamlet (1)
  • If you haven’t”
    • Save to Your Desktop and Title it with Your Name
    • Have the reading and your notebook accessible.

 Part III – Act 1.1, – Start from beginning and finish- Lines 1-61 Reading and Discussion

  • As you/we read-
    • Highlight and note some of the choices Shakespeare made to begin the play.
    • Underline unfamiliar words.
  • Part IV- Film Viewing. First 6:36 of the Film.

    What mood does the director create in the beginning of the play? How do his choices contribute to the meaning and aesthetic impact of Shakespeare’s words?

    Homework Review- Writing an objective summary using the Vocabulary from the text.

    Work in pairs to create/revise an objective summary of the scene using vocabulary from the text

  • Quick Write- Answer the following prompt in about a paragraph.What choices does Shakespeare make about how to begin the play? How do these choices contribute to meaning and aesthetic impact?

    Homework- Complete the following discussion questions from the first 61 lines of Act 1.1

  • Questions for lines 1-35 (Read and Answer in Your Notebook, before we share out).

Describe Barnardo and Francisco’s tone in the first five lines. What words demonstrate their tone?

– What is Barnardo doing in line 7?

-Given what you heard in the reading and read on the Character List, what is likely the “thing that Horatio asks whether is has “appeared again tonight” (line 26)?

-Reread lines 28-39. According to Marcellus, what does Horatio think of the Ghost?

-How many times have Barnardo and Marcellus seen the Ghost?

-Why is Horatio present in this scene?

Questions for Lines 36-46- Answer in your notebook before we share out.

-In lines 36-39, what does Barnardo suggest to Horatio?

-What mood does Shakespeare create through Barnado’s story? How does he accomplish this?

Questions for lines 47-61- Answer in your notebook before we share out.

-How does each of the men react to the appearance of the Ghost?

-Whom does the Ghost look like? Hint- use the character list to understand to whom the men refer.

-What is the cumulative impact of the men’s reactions on the mood of the text?

-Reread lines 54-58. Using the explanatory notes and context, paraphrase these lines. What is Horatio asking?

-How does the Ghost react to Horatio’s speech?

In addition to Barnardo’s story and the men’s reaction to the Ghost, how does Shakespeare create a mood in this act?

 

 

 

Class Agenda #82 – “Hamlet” – Intro

Class Agenda #82- Hamlet Intro

Opening Reading-

SLT- I Can determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

  1. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’sposition or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  2. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).
  3. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.

4. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

JOURNAL- In 1-2 sentences, self assess your capacity with this SLT. Give an example of a victory or a struggle with the target.

#1111- “Anything To Make You Happy” Bob Green’s Dance Orchestra (2:54  —  1923)

Standards

  •      

    RL.11-12.5

    I Can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

    Agenda-

    1. Introduction of Lesson Agenda
    2. Homework Accountability
    3. Masterful Reading
    4. Act 1.1, Lines 1–61 Reading and Discussion
    5. Quick Write
    6. Film Viewing
    7. Closing

     

  1. Hamlet Vocabulary- 
  • late (adj.) – living comparatively recently, now deceased
  •   unfold (v.) – reveal or display
  •   apparition (n.) – a supernatural appearance of a person or thing, especially a ghost
  •   assail (v.) – attack vigorously or violently; assault
  •   fortified (adj.) – protected or strengthened against attack
  •   stalks (v.) – walks with measured, stiff, or haughty strides
  • harrows (v.) – disturbs keenly or painfully; distresses the mind or feelings

    Mini Lesson-

  • Reviewing the SLT-
  • I Can analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
  • What are some other words for the word “impact”?

    How can an author choose to create a certain impact with a text?

Part II – New Reading!

“Hamlet” By William Shakespeare (1603).

  • 11.1.2_hamlet (1)
  • Save to Your Desktop and Title it with Your Name
  • Have the reading and your notebook accessible.

 Begin Reading- The Title and The Dramatis Personae

What information do you gather from the title of the play:“The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark?”

What tragedies have we read in or out of high school?

What information do you gather from the first six lines (four names) on the Dramatis Personae or Character List?

Part III – Act 1.1, Lines 1-61 Reading and Discussion

  • As you/we read-
    • Highlight and note some of the choices Shakespeare made to begin the play.
    • Underline unfamiliar words.

Questions for lines 1-35 (Read and Answer in Your Notebook, before we share out).

Describe Barnardo and Francisco’s tone in the first five lines. What words demonstrate their tone?

– What is Barnardo doing in line 7?

-Given what you heard in the reading and read on the Character List, what is likely the “thing that Horatio asks whether is has “appeared again tonight” (line 26)?

-Reread lines 28-39. According to Marcellus, what does Horatio think of the Ghost?

-How many times have Barnardo and Marcellus seen the Ghost?

-Why is Horatio present in this scene?

Questions for Lines 36-46- Answer in your notebook before we share out.

-In lines 36-39, what does Barnardo suggest to Horatio?

-What mood does Shakespeare create through Barnado’s story? How does he accomplish this?

Questions for lines 47-61- Answer in your notebook before we share out.

-How does each of the men react to the appearance of the Ghost?

-Whom does the Ghost look like? Hint- use the character list to understand to whom the men refer.

-What is the cumulative impact of the men’s reactions on the mood of the text?

-Reread lines 54-58. Using the explanatory notes and context, paraphrase these lines. What is Horatio asking?

-How does the Ghost react to Horatio’s speech?

In addition to Barnardo’s story and the men’s reaction to the Ghost, how does Shakespeare create a mood in this act?

 

Quick Write- Answer the following prompt in about a paragraph.

What choices does Shakespeare make about how to begin the play? How do these choices contribute to meaning and aesthetic impact?

Part IV- Film Viewing. First 6:36 of the Film.

What mood does the director create in the beginning of the play? How do his choices contribute to the meaning and aesthetic impact of Shakespeare’s words?

Homework-

Reread all of Act 1.1 (lines 1–190) and write an objective summary, using any of the vocabulary words as appropriate (unfold, apparition, assail, fortified, harrows, dreaded, stalks).

As We Read the first time- Create:

  • Annotated List of Characters as we Read

Second Reading

“A Good Man is Hard to Find”

Discussion Questions

  1. How does the grandmother’s early apprehensions about the trip to Florida foreshadow the major crisis in the story?
  1. What does the grandmother’s relationship to her family tell us about her personality?
  1. If the old woman had kept her mouth shut, not revealing that she recognized The Misfit, would the family be alive at the end of the story? Or did The Misfit intend to kill all the family members when he pulled up alongside their car?
  1. What does the grandmother say to the Misfit to try to convince him not to kill her? Does the conversation alter his viewpoints in any way?
  1. What has The Misfit’s life been like? Why was he put in jail? He says he kills for pleasure. Is there another reason?
  1. Explain the problem the Misfit has with Jesus. How is his religious conviction different from the grandmother’s?
  1. How do The Misfit’s final words illustrate his attitude toward the events of the afternoon?
  1. What is the role of chance or fate in the story?

Exit Ticket- 

Homework- Respond to some readings from the #validus.