Class Agenda #19 – What’s the Cue Column for?

Opener (whip around)- What was the question that was most asked to Mr. B yesterday?

Seats-Computers-HomePage

  • Yesterday we focused on this- the capture
  • SLT– I can use Cornell Notes to effectively capture*, evaluate and organize relevant information from a text.

 

  • Today we are focusing on the organize
  • The way to organize your notes, and your mind, is with The Cue Column$.

 

2 1/2”

Cue Column$

Reduce ideas and facts to concise jottings and summaries as cues for Reciting, Reviewing, and Reflecting.

6”

Notetaking Column

  1. *As you read/review texts, jot down any key phrases, important points or ideas, or thoughts that you have.
  2. Questions: As soon after class as possible, formulate questions based on the notes in the right-hand column. Writing questions helps to clarify meanings, reveal relationships, establish continuity, and strengthen memory. Also, the writing of questions sets up a perfect stage for exam-studying later.
  3. Recite: Cover the notetaking column with a sheet of paper. Then, looking at the questions or cue-words in the question and cue column only, say aloud, in your own words, the answers to the questions, facts, or ideas indicated by the cue-words.
  4. Reflect: Reflect on the material by asking yourself questions, for example: “What’s the significance of these facts? What principle are they based on? How can I apply them? How do they fit in with what I already know? What’s beyond them?
  5. Review: Spend at least ten minutes every week reviewing all your previous notes. If you do, you’ll retain a great deal for current use, as well as, for the exam.

2”

Summary

After class, use this space at the bottom of each page to summarize the notes on that page.

  • Look at our notes from yesterday and compare them to our Guiding Question-
    • Should the US Government offer reparations ot African American Citizens for atrocities committed in slavery, Jim Crow, “Separate but Equal,” and other systemic injustices?
  • Which notes so far help us answer this question?
  • Which notes are interesting but don’t really help?
  • Which notes are vocabulary words that we’d like to use?

Grapple Text- “The Case For Reparations” by Ta-Neshi Coates

Class Work-

  • Continue – of Chapter 1 in “The Case For Reparations” together.
  • Practice note taking.
  • Continue to read on your own.
  • Make a goal of taking 3 more notes.

Check In- Organize your Cue Column during the last 5 minutes.

Homework-

  • Finish Chapter 1 of our grapple text. Work with your Cornell Notes.
  • Practice note taking by reading 1 article from the #validus and filling starting a Cornell Notes for it in your notebook.
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