Monthly Archives: March 2014

Class Agenda #32- Animal Farm Kickoff

Opener- In your Groups, Create a skit, play, scene, tableau or visual representation of at least one of the following commandments.

Mini-Lesson:

Making the Animal Farm text a savable PDF on your Homescreen – Animal Farm Full Text

Define- al·le·go·ry

noun \ˈa-lə-ˌgȯr-ē\

: a story in which the characters and events are symbols that stand for ideas about human life or for a political or historical situation

Animal Farm overview

 

SLTs- 

  • I can identify evidence from a text to analyze and draw inferences from. (R1)
    • I can use close reading techniques to highlight the key points of central characters and events in Animal Farm

CFU-

  • How is Animal Farm an Allegory for The Russian Revolution?
  • What do you think of an author using an allegory to make a point on humanity?

Texts-

Prompts-

  • What are the conflicts in Animal Farm? What types of conflict (physical, moral, intellectual, or emotional) do you see in this story?
  • What are some themes in the story? How do they relate to the plot and characters?
  • What are some symbols in Animal Farm? How do they relate to the plot and characters?

Tasks-

Read together

As you read- Underline evidence that helps answer the above questions.

 

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Class Agenda #31- Animal Farm Kickoff

Opener- Write in your notebook- What are the first thoughts that come to mind?

Replace the word “animal” with “people” and how does that affect your impressions of the commandments?

Mini-Lesson:

Making the Animal Farm text a savable PDF on your Homescreen – Animal Farm Full Text

Define- al·le·go·ry

 noun \ˈa-lə-ˌgȯr-ē\

: a story in which the characters and events are symbols that stand for ideas about human life or for a political or historical situation

Animal Farm overview

 

SLTs- 

  • I can identify evidence from a text to analyze and draw inferences from. (R1)
    • I can use close reading techniques to highlight the key points of central characters and events in Animal Farm

CFU-

  • How is Animal Farm an Allegory for The Russian Revolution?
  • What do you think of an author using an allegory to make a point on humanity?

Texts-

Prompts-

  • What are the conflicts in Animal Farm? What types of conflict (physical, moral, intellectual, or emotional) do you see in this story?
  • What are some themes in the story? How do they relate to the plot and characters?
  • What are some symbols in Animal Farm? How do they relate to the plot and characters?

Tasks-

Read together

As you read- Underline evidence that helps answer the above questions.

 

Class Agenda #30- BBK Russian Revolution -Cornell Notes

Opener- Whether you’ve started on this one or not, spend 10 minutes reading and taking Cornell Notes on Trotsky

 

Prompts- Review together

  • What are the philosophical similarities and differences between Russian leaders Lenin, Tortsky and Stalin?
  • What are the differences in their approaches to ruling their country?
  • Of Karl Marx, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and Joseph Stalin, who do you identify with the most and why?

Mini-Lesson: An adjustment to your Cornell Notes.

  • You can continue to take general notes, but we’re trying to figure out why these characters and events have historical significance, so let’s try to be a bit more choosy.-
  • You still want to know some general information about these people and events, but you’re also

SLTs- 

  • I can identify evidence from a text to analyze and draw inferences from. (R1)
    • I can use Cornell Notes to highlight the key points of central characters and events in early 20th century Russian History

CFU- Based off of the video-

  • What ideals did Trotsky try to spread? And how did he do this?
  • Who did Trotsky connect with?- why? What’s revolutionary ferver?
  • Who did Trotsky clash with? why?

 

Texts-

 

Tasks-

Round 2 – Fill out Cornell Notes for each section. Stineman and B work with designated groupings.

(CFU) Discussion Questions- Can be turned into a reaction paper

  • What are the philosophical similarities and differences between Russian leaders Lenin, Tortsky and Stalin?
  • What are the differences in their approaches to ruling their country?
  • Of Karl Marx, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and Joseph Stalin, who do you identify with the most and why?

Exit ticket- How do you define happiness? What does being happy look like to you? E-mail your answer to Boccheciamp and Stineman.

Class Agenda #29 – BBK Russian Revolution -Cornell Notes

Opener-

With the other members of your group, use at least 5 of the following words in a single paragraph about Russia or about Relationships.

Vocabulary- Devastating, Rampart, Regiment, Triumphed, Quell, Clamoring, Exhumed, Radical, Disastrous

Submit- E-mail your Paragraph to Boccheciamp and Stineman. CC your table-mates. If you finish early, move on to Round 2.

 Share Out-

  • SLTs- 
  • I can identify evidence from a text to analyze and draw inferences from. (R1)
    • I can use Cornell Notes to highlight the key points of central characters and events in early 20th century Russian History

Prompts- Review together

  • What are the philosophical similarities and differences between Russian leaders Lenin, Tortsky and Stalin?
  • What are the differences in their approaches to ruling their country?
  • Of Karl Marx, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and Joseph Stalin, who do you identify with the most and why?

Mini-Lesson: An adjustment to your Cornell Notes.

  • You can continue to take general notes, but we’re trying to figure out why these characters and events have historical significance, so let’s try to be a bit more choosy.-
  • You still want to know some general information about these people and events, but you’re also

Texts-

 

Tasks-

Round 2 – Fill out Cornell Notes for each section. Stineman and B work with designated groupings.

(CFU) Discussion Questions- Can be turned into a reaction paper

  • What are the philosophical similarities and differences between Russian leaders Lenin, Tortsky and Stalin?
  • What are the differences in their approaches to ruling their country?
  • Of Karl Marx, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and Joseph Stalin, who do you identify with the most and why?

Exit ticket- How do you define happiness? What does being happy look like to you? E-mail your answer to Boccheciamp and Stineman.

Class Agenda #28 – BBK Russian Revolution – Vocab Focus

Opener- 2 minutes

  • Notebook and Class Page

 

  • SLTs- 
  • I can identify evidence to analyze the text and draw inferences. (R1)
    • I can use a Cornell Notes organizer to highlight important points from a series of on-line texts.

Texts-

Tasks-

Round 1- The skill you’re using is called Skimming. (THIS SHOULD BE COMPLETED)

Find at least 10 words that are new to you, or that are impressive to you:

    • Copy the word in your notebook.
    • Identify the root word, if applicable. Define in the word. Write if it’s a Noun, Verb, Adjective, etc…
    • Evaluate how the word is being used. What is the context?

Round II- Fill out Cornell Notes for each section. Stineman and B work with designated groupings.

(CFU) Discussion Questions- Can be turned into a reaction paper

  • What are the philosophical similarities and differences between Russian leaders Lenin, Tortsky and Stalin?
  • What are the differences in their approaches to ruling their country?
  • Of Karl Marx, Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and Joseph Stalin, who do you identify with the most and why?

Exit ticket- Summarize the main points of 1 person who we studied today. E-Mail it to B and Stineman.

Class Agenda #26 – Dirty Wars Conclusion…

Opener- 2 minutes

  • Does learning about America’s covert operations around the world change your opinions of The United States? US Military? Our Global “Enemies?” Explain yourself.
  • CFU- Popcorn share out
  • CFU- Respond to another student

SLTs- 

  • I can identify evidence to analyze the text and draw inferences. (R1)
    • I can use a Cornell Notes organizer to highlight important points from a film.
  • I can develop an argument using relevant and sufficient evidence
    • I can use specifics from the film “Dirty Wars” to take a stance for or against American foreign interventions.

 

Text (25 min)- “Dirty Wars” streaming on Netflix.

Task- Fill out Cornell Notes. Stineman and B work with designated groupings.

  • CFU- Quick Write- If you could ask the journalist in this film 2 questions, what would they be?
  • Exit- Reaction Paper- You have 10 minutes+ to work on a reaction paper for MP2

Homework- Don’t forget to start your next cycle of 10 reaction papers.

Class Agenda #25 – Dirty Wars Continued…

Opener- 2 minutes

  • What is the most surprising part of the film “Dirty Wars?”

Popcorn share out 

SLTs- 

  • I can identify evidence to analyze the text and draw inferences. (R1)
    • I can use a Cornell Notes organizer to highlight important points from a film.
  • I can summarize how the ideas, themes, or conclusions of a text are developed and connected.
    • I can summarize the main points of the United States involvement in a “Dirty War” in my Cornell Notes.

Text (25 min)- “Dirty Wars” streaming on Netflix.

Task- Fill out Cornell Notes. Stineman and B work with designated groupings.

  • CFU- Quick Write- If you could ask the journalist in this film 2 questions, what would they be?
  • Exit- Reaction- Does learning about America’s covert operations around the world change your opinions of The United States? US Military? Our Global “Enemies?” Explain yourself.

Homework- Don’t forget to start your next cycle of 10 reaction papers.